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why now? i want to share a few things. one is that once we start implementing the law and the mechanisms started falling in place and in the first year we got 1,000 cases nudged and then results. .. the mechanism is one thing. the greeting that oxygen, the way we can breed of the greeting as space for rigging a plan and not be bastrop away. women who complain, stigma and retaliation. that is the part that probably would need to focus on. the other thing i felt was that it was really a universal issue. i, during my struggle in the last ten years, have probably read about every sexual-harassment case. and every country, i went to japan a month ago and there it was everywhere in the public place and offices. so i felt like this is something that we really need to a not divide up the world, and this is the part where women have problems and this is a part of the world that has the outcome. we will need to develop a bond of solidarity. when need to talk about our struggles. countries like pakistan, one case of a gang rape or something happens and then it goes into the media
that it results in ecation, you must follow the law and value of government napse and provide the overside as well as appropriation and follow the constitution. that is radical stuff, isn't it? >> it used to be bipartisan and wide agreement on that. but we live if an different era, where four years the democrats refuse to pass a budget at all. when they did the budget would rai taxes an additional $1.5 trillion on top of $1.7 trillion in tax increases that have already happens. it doesn't meaningfully cut spending in any real well. i never balances. it does nothing to save and reform entitlement, social security and medicare to preserve the programs for seniors and make sure they are strong and vibrant going forward to zo next generations can rely on that. >> lou: the senate, much of its time taken up with the house. on gun control. senators toomey and manchin, coming up with a deal. >> i don't remember the last time that it became a big deal for two senators to reach a deal. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between the two of them som
proponents thinks these weapons are a problem in the hands of law-abiegd citizens, but apparently see no problem with the same weapons being galorified in hollywood movies or video games, where the game is interactive, violent, and you are literally shooting at people. >> jon: that's one, video games you are not literally shooting at people. ( laughter ) what you're shooting it isaise series of 0s and 1s organized into a two-dimension stall representation of a three-dimensional-- i guess i'm not considering the real-world consequences of checking to see if someone buying a gun on the internet is a convicted felon who moderates a charlie manson message board. "hey, guys, let's not get off topic. you want to talk about 'live with kelly and michael' that's a different board. you have to keep the conversation here manson related." >> in my opinion, adopting mandatory federal government background checks for purely private transactions between law abiding citizens puts u inexoray on the path for a itself registration. >> it is not currently proposed but if the bill being considered were a
protecting the community. it gives you a feeling of unity. i can't remember the last time i have seen law enforcement cheered like this as they drive-thru with lights flashing. there is a helicopter flying overhead as well. the helicopter that played a big role in spotting the suspects. they are cheering the helicopter, the police cars. just an incredible night in watertown, brian. >> i'm sitting here thinking i have known a lot of cops. i grew up with a lot. i have done a lot of ride alongs on the night shift. if you have known a police officer and you have been with them it can sometimes feel like the most thankless job in the world. yet on their worst day ever to have their best reception ever on the job, nothing wrong with this in the world. this is awfully gratifying. they have done something extraordinary. >> reporter: exactly. in talking to the police officers, they really feel that. a police officer was lost at m.i.t. another officer was badly wounded. you know, they took hits along the way here. it could have been a lot worse. in talking to people in the community, law enforcemen
would have happened. >> what would have happened? >> law enforcement and elected officials speaking for a relieved public. but very mindful all throughout of what already lost. >> we are exhausted, folkings, but we have a victory here tonight and so let's not forget the people along the way. >> it a complicated case and a challenging case and there are still questions remaining to be answered. as the cornel said because of the extraordinary collabation by all . law enforcement accident and resources and assets and peoplals who brought their a game, we have a suspect in custody tonight. >> four days ago my city was ruthlessly attack there is no explaining the savagery involve would and i spent the last several days looking at hundreds of hours of videotape and i got to see how brutal that attack over and over again and more importantly i got to see what the boston police officer and medical personnel and other first responders did to put people back together. turen u turn quiet andem stemming the bleed their hand and putting a man on fire out with their hand and this is the kind of t
, a neighbor, who quickly alerted law enforcement. at 8:40 eastern, applause on the scene as we heard moments ago. and moments later, this tweet from the boston police department, "suspect in custody. officers sweeping the area. stand by for further info. "president obama will speak a minute or so from now. the suspect is taken alive, now in the hospital in serious condition. the exact meaning of that unclear. let's go to jessica yellin who is standing by at the white house. jessica? >> reporter: anderson, this is an opportunity for the president to come out here and cheer on boston. thank the police there, honor the victims, and remind the nation that america doesn't stop for terrorism. president obama watched all of this unfold and the capture go down live on television in the white house as the rest of the nation did. as soon as he learned that the capture was happening, he went across the coloinated, over to the oval office and sat there with staff where he got a call from fbi director muller who officially notified him that it was true, the suspect was captured alive. then the president
. >> what are your thought as we look at how this unfolded. my hat goes off to law enforcement. we can only hope they will get the information as this goes forward. >> all week log, i am overwhelmed at the public support, the cooperation between the public, the law enforcement and the media and the way the word got out and the outpouring of help. i think back to the times i was working on the unabomb and atf and postal inspection service and working in the mountains of western north carolina, on the olympic bomber, eric robert rudolph. one of the things that came back to me as i thought about those days and i watched these people in action, they worked hard all week. they are exhausted. the people of boston are composted. and tonight, they show the world and set an example what have america's all about in the face of tential tragedies. i also think back and can't help but to wonder and think about the fact we are sitting here on top of april 19, april 20, these are significant days to anyone who has worked terrorism. this is the anniversary of the oklahoma city bombing in april of 1995. it
was there when the law enforcement pulled up, along with his nephew and the entire neighborhood became an enormous crime scene in the final moments. here is bob glatz. >> it sounded like they said he's still alive, take cover. then some flash bombs or something, some loud noises went off after that. nick and i again kind of ducked down, not knowing what to expect. >> incredible that bob had the foresight and ability to shoot that in the intense moment. and he his nephew looking down from their home from an upper window. his nephew had a chance to just tell me what it was like to be in this neighborhood in lockdown and then to finally realize that the individual, this person that law enforcement authorities were referring to as a terrorist throughout the day had yet to be found, was right there on their block. take a listen. >> looking back, it's pretty scary because it was actually a fairly nice day out. we had gone out on the back deck a couple of times to get fresh air after being cooped up. and now i'm looking back thinking like, holy crap, this kid could have come up on the deck an
in ten or 15 minutes. >> we learned today from the law enforcement press conference around 5:00 that suspect number two, when who has been identified as dzhokar tsarnaev escaped last night's shootout. his older brother died. that's confirmed as well. and we were told today at the press conference, i think much to people's astonishment that dzhokar tsarnaev escaped on foot. and how could he possibly escape the scene on foot and be far away, and now if that is the case and he is in the boat and just a square mile away, that it makes sense he found somewhere to hide in intervening hours. >> yeah. a couple of interesting things should be pointed out. one, first of all, it is really remarkable that he was not discovered last night. because the police presence that was on the ground in this very concentrated area was unlike anything i had ever seen. there were literally hundreds of officers and equipped in tactical outfits and flak jackets and armed with assault rifles going through the neighborhood. there were at least a half dozen different agencies responding, including state po
--from personal grievance to public law". the book describes what happened when 11 women joined the campaign to go into the un only to be attacked by there un managers. the case culminated in legislation by the pakistani parliament in 2000 that make sexual harassment crime. she is the chair person, and human rights and democracy streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can, at least up to the limit. i am going to tell you a story today and the stories in the context of pakistan, about one woman and also celebration of women in pakistan but it resonates universally, goes across borders. this is about a legislation we got in pakistan against sexual
, president obama praising law enforcement in trackinging down the suspect, late last night after authorities announced they captured their man, this is what the president had to say. >> boston police and state police and local police across the come mop wealth of massachusetts responded with professionalism and bravery over five long days and tonight, because of their determined efforts, we have closed an important chapter in this tragedy. >> nbc's kristen welker at the white house for us. what's happening at the white house today? >> no events on the president's schedule but i can tell you behind the scenes, i have been told by administration officials, the president will be in contact with his national security team when necessary to monitor the ongoing developments in this investigation. you remember when president obama spoke last night, craig, he said there are a number of questions that need to be anticipated, included what motivated these two young men to take these hape noeinous action and of course did they have accomplices? that is the question everybody wants answered now. i don't
poured out of their homes to applaud law enforcement. suspect number 1, tamerlan tsarnaev, killed earlier in the day after a wild shootout. we've got jam packed hour today. adam housley is outside beth israel hospital where suspect number 2 is under guard. catherine herridge is following the investigation. here in studio is america's mayor, mayor rudy guiliani. first let's go to adam in boston. bring us up to date on the very latest. >> yes. we're hearing from the f.b.i. there may be a statement coming out at some point in the next couple of minutes. we haven't heard from them since last night. we heard about the suspect brought here in certificates condition. i'll step away. you can see the police presence is here at the hospital in boston. it's been here all night. every exit and entrance is covered. the floor where the suspect number 2 dzhokhar tsarnaev is located has police presence as well, as you might imagine outside his room and on the hospital floor. anybody going in, coming out of this hospital has to have their bag checked, as well as their i.d we also have the picture from the
was seriously injured later in a shotout. the two graduated from the police academy together. next how law enforcement got their man, the tracking of the surveillance, the military steps that went into capturing the marathon bombing suspects. about marriage. children. money. about tomorrow. here's to good decisions. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your family's future? we'll help you get there. ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> we're going to get some expert analysis on several aspects of the capture of the suspected boston bomber. this is a former assistant director at the fbi and cnn and cyst and jeff is a security analyst worked for the fbi. these thermal images that we're looking at, the suspect before he was captured. i know what i see but as a law enforcement officer who is to bring this suspect into court and to talk about this, what do you see sna how does this
here and -- malls here and starting to bring in massive amounts of law enforcement, 1,000, maybe 1500 people there and 200 or 300 reporters. a lot of trucks settling. and then it started to getting to a drone. we kept on delays in press conferences and then you couldn't ask questions. they would just read statements. they had the governor there, the mayor there and the head of the police department and the state police. then they told us to go away. >> suarez: we have a half minute left. was there a sense as it was reaching the final moment that's a corner had been turned, that this was almost over? >> yes. after they lifted the lockdown order all of a sudden they have these shots and they seemed to absolutely have found him. and now they do and the cheers went up and now it's over. >> suarez: bruce, just a short time ago it's been confirmed three other people were taken into custody in new bedford not far from where dzhokar tsarnaev attends college at a branch of university massachusetts system. do we know about that? >> i don't. if you put pieces of the puzzle they told us they were
. >> there is a massive manhunt under way. a lot of law enforcement involved in that. to assist that we have suspended all service on the m.b.t.a., our public transit service, and this will continue until we think it's safe to open all or some of that. we're asking people to shelter in place-- in other words to stay indoors with their doors locked and notto open the door for anyo other than a properly identified law enforcement officer. and that applies here in watertown where we are right now. also cambridge, waltham, newton, belmont and, at this point, all of boston. all of boston. this is a serious situation. we're taking it seriously. we're asking the public to take it seriously as well and to assist law enforcement by following these simple instructions. we've got every asset that we can possibly muster on the ground right now. they are doing a terrific job and working in concert with each other but we are going to need the public to help us help them stay safe. >> reporter: in washington, the president convened a briefing in the white house situation room with almost a dozen top aides. the search f
, but also if the law itself is unjust. and so in this case, i believe that the laws around trespassing are unjust. and so accepting a jail sentence seems to me, for me the way i can best bear witness to that. >> what will your children do while you're in -- >> well, i have a great marriage. and so as my husband says, "there's a reason, you know, that kids have two parents." >> yeah. >> and so as i've told my children in the days leading up to this that, "if it is ever the case that i can be a better parent to you in jail rather than out of jail, i'm ready to be that parent." >> you were arrested, as you say, for trespassing. you broke the law. you knew you were breaking the law. what did you hope would happen? >> well, the 12 of us blocked a driveway that a company called inergy is using to prepare abandoned salt caverns that are underneath the west bank of seneca lake. we've been salt mining in the finger lakes area of upstate new york since the 1900s -- 1800s, actually. it goes back a long way. and so there are these abandoned underground chambers that are now being repurposed for th
it with a constitutional law attorney and former deputy assistant attorney general under president bush. he joins us now. i wasn't even aware this could be done in national security cases. tell us about how it works. >> sure. it's a rare exception. basically what it does is it allows law enforcement to delay issuing a suspect his miranda rights for a limited period to enable law enforcement to get information that would be relevant to public safety. for example, in this case one of the things we want to ask this guy is: is there another attack that might be imminent? who are you working with? are you part of a larger network? questions aimed at making sure public safety is protected, making sure we get any information that is time sensitive right now before he lawyers up and doesn't want to talk with us anymore. >>alisyn: we know that is vitally important because apparently the suspect planted other pipe bombs or explosives, at least, along the chase route. so they somehow knew that when they were trying to get away they had even, you know, planted other things to try to hurt and inflict more harm. so thi
for that video to be submitted to law-enforcement. that was a very effective member -- and effective method. morning's "wall street journal," -- you say no? guest: the identification was fairly quick and effective. there were numerous sources online. enforcement tow quickly anidentify the suspects. -- butoston best investigators you did -- boston investigators used a video from various sources. in the fourth amendment it hinges on the idea you have kept reasonable expectation of privacy. do you have a reasonable expectation of privacy when you are walking on a public street? a tricky question. oftentimes it comes down to this question. you do not have an expectation of privacy in a public street. but you also did not have the expectation that everything you say and do is going to be recorded, that that recording is going to be retained indefinitely, perhaps catalogued in a database in the federal government. he did not have the expectation that every one of your conference stations are going to be recorded in kept forever. this is a tricky and thorny question that comes up with the surveill
. but as the colonel said, because of that extraordinary collaboration and cooperation by all of these law enforcement resources and assets and more to the point people, professionals, who brought their "a" game, we have a suspect in custody tonight. >> the community stood strong. it was a call from a resident in watertown. we asked you to remain vigilant, and you did. we got that call and we got the guy. and so we can't thank you enough. you've done everything and more than we've asked. extremely proud of law enforcement today and what we've accomplished. >> this whole ordeal started monday with the bombing attack at the finish line of the boston marathon. three people were killed, more than 170 injured. the suspect's older brother died early friday morning following a shootout with police. the two men are also suspected of killing an m.i.t. police officer, 26-year-old sean collier, who was sitting in his patrol car. now, police hope that the surviving suspect will be able to give them some critical information about a possible motive and whether any more people were involved. nbc's katy tur has been
. under a law of war we can hold the suspect to a enemy combatment not entitled to miranda warnings or the appointment of counsel. the older brother, he was killed on friday, and they investigated him at the request of a foreign government, and they did not find any ties to terrorism. and we are joined from london by a counterterrorism expert, and mike sullivan here is a former acting director of the bureau of tobacco, firearms and explosives. let's start with you in london, will. the fbi talked to this man in 2011. it does beg the question, did they miss something when they talked to tamerlan tsarnaev? >> well, it's always very difficult to say. however, having said that, if you have an individual that is brought in by the authorities and questioned, again, without knowing exactly what the topic or agenda was that they were requesting him on, one would say that there was sufficient intelligence that may have been brought to them by this foreign government. and they could be a potential risk. and one would have hoped they would have been continually monitored beyond that point to in
on "today in the bay." some 9,000 people from every law enforcement agency near and far descended on boston to help catch the the two men who terrorized the city. coming up on "today in the bay," we sit down with an expert on s.w.a.t. emergency communication to discuss what it takes to keep the country safe from these types of attacks. this and all the morning's top stories coming up at 7:00 on "today in the bay. we'll have another local update for you in 30 minutes. for now, back to the "today" show. [ male announcer ] a car that can actually see like a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. ♪ the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. >>> celebration in the streets of boston. relieved residents there thanking law enforcement officers for their bravery last night. cheering the "usa" after remaining boston bombing suspect was captured. it came after a dramatic end to these events. a hail of gunfire followed a day in which included an unprecedented lockdow
today to praise law enforcement and those involved in tracking tsarnaev down. >> americans refused to be terrorized. ultimately, that's what we'll remember from this week. that's what will remain, the stories of heroism and kindness, resolve and resilience, generosity, and love. >> authorities caught up with the suspect after a tip from a watertown resident. he was hiding in a boat parked outside a home. he is now in a boston hospital and nbc's ron allen is joining me from there. ron, with a good afternoon to you, let's get the very latest on his condition. are you getting word from the hospital or are they staying somewhat silent on that? >> reporter: absolutely silent, alex. they're basically saying ask the fbi, ask the police about that, and they are saying nothing as well. it's a very tight lid on top of any information about him so far today. that could change perhaps, but you have to understand and, of course, you do, that this is a very, very delicate and sensitive situation and so it seems unlikely that the doctors are going to tell us a lot about what his condition is, par
five years of professional journalism, i decided to hang it up and go back to law school. the good news? i saved enough to pay for my first year all through the stock market. i would i would never have been able to make enough had i just kept it in a saving account. and by the way, let's be clear, an index fund would have made me nothing, nothing at all. if you want to go and get started, go small. invest in what you know. research it intensely. back then, i got old data from the public library. now information is free, ubiquitous. including up to the minute financials, analyst presentations, conference calls that i tell ur are musts if you're going to know what you are doing. simple? no. lucrative? you bet it is. kiann in new york. >> caller: hi, jim-bo. >> yo. >> caller: general question for you. what could be considered a good rate of return on investment and does it differ depending on asset class? >> i think you're measured against bonds. if you can get something, say, twice the risk free rate and get a good tax rate on it, in other words, like you have a reduced tax on the dividen
the community, boston is waking up breathing a little easier. for law enforcement the work isn't done. >> the families of those killed so senselessly deserve answers. the wounded, some of whom now have to learn how to stand and walk and li again deserve answers. >> reporter: and speaking of that there is new information right now from a department of justice official saying that federal prosecutors are at the hospital right now. they are working on charges and apparently they have been here since last night. also want to point out that many people still remembering of course the victims today. there are more than 50 of them from the boston marathon bombings that remain in the hospital right now. three of them are in critical condition. >> live for us in boston. thank you for that. >>> a bay area law man may have played a role in the capture of the suspect. some of the swat tactics came from a training program developed by the sheriff of alameda. coming up how law enforcement may have indirectly helped police track down the accused killer. >>> runners showing their support for boston
the audience. please wait until you get a microphone before u.s. to because of laws we will pick you up on camera. u.s. a question? down here in front. you have to wait for the microphone. and copley's to do as a favor. not accusing you, don't make a speech. as the question. >> my question is whether their is a real parallel between the argument for abolishing slavery and the argument for abolishing war. >> sounds like that's yours. >> the question is, is there real parallel? i don't know. the point that i was trying to make was i think every generation does seven things and italy. we do things that make us more -- morally queasy, but we think we have to do them. i would say that for our generation as for pretty much every generation before us, war is one of those things. again, ask for a show of hands. how many people think the war is a good thing and have many people think that war should never be used as a policy? >> we are then obviously all conflicted. i think if you look back on previous generations, to think that we can't morally understand how honest, sincere people could believ
, under secretary norman went in and froze the the 1981 bill that became law, that the reagan tax cut we are talking about earlier so it was a practical handle. the neat thing that you recount again five years later it didn't make a difference. four or five years later by 1984 there were 40 other organizations doing knockoffs of what the mandate for leadership had been. >> when i interviewed the president of other think tanks in washington d.c. brookings and c s i s and kato, i said what difference has the heritage approach to research made? all the difference in the world. the brookings president said we now do what heritage first started so heritage really, and i say that in the book, change the think tank culture of washington d.c.. >> one of the neatest things that i can say among all of you, 25, 30 years ago when phil and i were just getting our feet wet at heritage there weren't 600 people in the united states who knew what a think tank was. 600,000 people have voluntarily supported us. that is incredible. incredible impact. >> glad you mentioned that because there is no other thin
of them now dead. what a terrible toll they leave behind. it all ended tonight as one law enforcement official put it with a whimper. inside a boat in a trailer in a backyard in watertown, massachusetts. then it ended with a genuine cheer. all those first responders, cops, firemen as they exited town. the town that was terrorized by a gun battle in the streets last night. they were all cheered. and they had a chance to shine. bask in the glow of joyful citizens who were just thankful, they came in, they rode in to save the day. kate snow was there amid all of it tonight. and she is joining us tonight to start it all off. kate, good evening. >> good evening to you, brian. let's remember what this week has been like. a week that seemed like it would just never end in boston. on monday you had the devastating bombings at the marathon. a couple of days later last night, the fbi holds a press conference showing video and pictures of two key suspects and asking the public for help. the first sign of a major development in the manhunt came about 10:00 p.m. eastern time thursday, about five h
rush. one came from massachusetts, from harvard and yale law school. so was an odd mix. one was a politician, businessman, double dealer, self-promoter, who became the first superintendent of yellowstone national park. the sent one, whose father had followed the gold rush, was a soldier, a humble cavalry lieutenant who is also a self-taught scientist, brilliant man, phenomenal writer, who wrote the first great account of the exploration of yellow stone in 1870 that was haled at the time by the leading scientist office the day as the greates writings sip lewis and clark, and the third was the harvard and yale law school bookish hype ocon dry yack scholar, who became like men in the west, driven by fear, for a of the others he walked from independence, iowa to the montana gold rush. acted the politician and future superintendent, and like a lot of white men who settled there, he became an exterminationist. i think about the conversation in the earlier panel about the problem for historians out presentism. how you impose the moral assumptions and values of the present on the re
is in custody the last thing we should want for him is to remain silent. under the law of war we can hold this suspect as a potential enemy combatant not entitled to miranda warnings or the appointment of counsel." with us now from new york is paul callan, former new york prosecutor. what are police trying to find out from him at this point? >> i think we're trying to find out what things, first, are there other unexploded bombs out there that have to be recovered to protect the public and secondly they're going to want to know how did you get all of this explosive material? who sold it to you? where is the chain? are there others who may be involved in some kind of a broader conspiracy? those are the two areas that i think federal authorities would be exploring. >> obviously there are a lot of legal implications about this and a great deal of discussion about this. i want to you listen to what alan dershowitz said. >> the government made a mistake claiming the exception to miranda when the police said there's no public safety, it's solved, it's over, there are no further threats but the
in the rule book that says a golden retriever can't play basketball. ( laughter ). although, under current law, it can buy a gun. ( laughter ). and the heroes-- folks, the heroes were not just republicans. four brave democrats joined in. including alaska senator mark begich. who celebrated his vote to kill background checks saying, "it's dangerous to do any type of policy in an emotional moment." yes, true leadership is waiting until the moment has passed. ( laughter ). that's why i've always believed that we should have waited until 1950 to declare war on japan. ( laughter ) you know, when things have cooled off, but no, old speed racer over here just could not wait to take away hirohito's guns. never again. and i especially want to salute senate majority leader wayne lapierre. he delivered a huge victory for a misunderstood minority, the 8% of americans who are against universal background checks. now, some say anyone who would oppose keeping dwuns out of the handed of murderers and the mentally ill are outside of the mainstream, perhaps even psychologically unsound themselves, but we'll nev
turned boston into almost a state of martial law. in the public garden we saw the swan boats were just sitting there. they were floating in the lagoon. nobody was there. they've been a boston tradition for over 130 years. in the boston common there were more s.w.a.t. teams than people. usually, that's a place where workers and runners go by the thousands. the freedom trail, which is the red brick line that takes tourists and school children to all the historic sites in this city, connected to the american revolution, no one was walking the freedom trail. it was a very unusual day. and yet, even though people were inconvenienced, even though they were told to stay in their homes, people i talked to, brian, as the lockdown went on, they all said one thing, they didn't want the suspect to be killed when he was captured. they wanted him to be taken alive because more than anything they want answers as to why those two men did what they did to the city of boston, to the boston marathon, and to this country because people don't understand how somebody could leave bombs in a crowd of people o
of a bank account or something, you know. if you think unilaterally the dictator for a day passed one law, what would you do? that's definitely a major flaw in the republican thinking. they assume we're going to be dictator for one day and limit government by doing that. in fact we're dictators for life and government gets bigger. to get to the spirit of your question, i think if we could reverse or somewhat change the relationship between the federal government and the states, i think that is the most lasting thing to serve to limit government. the vision of competing multiple jurisdiction of preventing consolidation of power is valid and valid in this century as well. the senates go hat and hand in washington asking for federal money. >> hi, spencer with the "daily caller" you reference the mythical permanent majority of the republican party. of course they disappeared. now we see a vision the establishment fading way. tea party segment is rising. do you think that is a permanent influence on the modern republican party now? if so give that is a grassroots movement is there anything you
put the law on your side. ♪ john: watching tv news, reading the papers, you assume the horrible hateful thing going on in america is our burning fossil fuel. i'm told we are destroying the earth. we burn more than other countries. the national audubon association says there is no greer threat to our environment. but my ne guest matt dley says the opposite is true. how can that be the case? >> if you think about it, it means we are not burning something else. not cutting down the forest. the more we burn fossil fls, the more we can produce fertilizer meaning we use less land to grow food we can spare the land for the forest, thursday next forest increase particularly in america. there is a fascinating new discovery that the world as a whole is getting greener. the amazon rain forest is actually getting greener. partly becau we're putting more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere making grass grow faster. john: let's break that down. in general there is less farmland and more land returned to forest because we burn oil, coal instead of trees. >> new england now 70% forest. countries l
. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed: the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy alof these years. ♪ >>> time to spin the comment roulette wheel. every week we receive tons of messages on our facebook, twirt, e-mail, radio show comment line. we pick through them and play this part of the program where your voice can be heard. we call it comment roulette. let's spin the wheel. a message via facebook. linda thinks even some high-profile liberals will object to putting the cap on retirement accounts. she writes, the one who really needs to be worried about the $3 million cap is michelle obama. that would only last her about one week. let's give the wheel another spin. we've got a message coming in via facebook. shelley can't believe politicians want to start flag
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